Todays venues demand more wireless capability. QLX-D® 24-bit digital audio Digital Wireless is more than delivers crystal clear audio with encrypted security and a broad range of selectable channels. easy to use setup wizards simplify access to the very robust control that AV Professionals appreciate.


The 24-bit digital audio and the wide frequency response capture the sound as clearly and accurately as it was produced.

Confidentiality is ensured via AES-256 advanced encryption that generates a randomized key for each use.

 

Included in every rental:

1 ea. QLXD4 Receiver with Power Supply

1 ea. QLXD Transmitter (Select between Handheld , Bodypack, Tabletop Base

1 ea. Microphone or Instrument Cable (Lavalier, Goosneck or Handheld)

2 ea. Antennae

1 ea 5' XLRI Cable

 

Optional Items:

Earset / Headset 

Broadcast Quality T47 Lavalier 

Antanna Combiner with Paddles

 

Features:

  • Professional-grade metal construction
  • 64 MHz of tuning bandwidth
  • Up to 17 compatible systems in 6MHz or 21 channels in 8MHz DTV range
  • Ethernet networking for control strings, firmware updates, Wireless Workbench 6 and ShurePlus Channels for iOS
  • Transmitter types include handheld and bodypack
  • Compatible with ULX-D® boundary and gooseneck transmitters

Shure QLXD Digital UHF

$69,00Precio
  • There are two basic types of Wireless Microphones

    Bodypack Transmitters are Used for Lavaliere or “Lapel” Mics, Earset Headworn Mics  and also Instrument Cables

    Lavaliere Microphones, often called “Lapel Mics” or “Clip-On Mics” are a very popular form factor for presenters and public speakers who want the ability to move above with their hands free.

    Lavalieres are excellent for situations requiring “invisible” microphones. These also work well for novice / occasional presenters who are uncomfortable with holding a microphone in their hand or wearing something on their head.

    The  down side to Lavalieres is that they are more prone to feedback and typically provide less signal then a Handheld or Earset.  Having said that – a good sound engineer with the right equipment should have no problem implementing a Lavaliere mic.

    Earset or Microboom Mics

    Earset or MicroBoom microphonesare often referred to as “Countryman Mics” after Carl Countryman , one of the early innovators of the technology - he was also President and Chief Engineer of Countryman & Associates of Menlo Park, California.  These microphones clip to either one ear or both, and typically offer a much better signal that Lavaliere mics simply due to the closer proximity to the speakers mouth.

    Earset mics are excellent for public speaking as well as theatrical performances.  There even models designed to work well for robust singing voices.

    The down side to Earset mics is getting used to something “hanging from your ear”.  There is a tendency to want to reach up and touch it to make sure it is still there correctly.

    Handheld Transmitters are used for the traditional Microphone style.

    Handheld Transmitters provide the most wide-ranging assortment of applications.  The nature and design make them the easiest to use by the “Do it Yourself” person or beginner sound engineer. There are a wide variety Microphone “Elements” available. The element is the end of the microphone, usually round or conical . (in the image above it is silver in color) Different elements work better for different applications.  Handheld Transmitters work best when held directly ion front of the mount or sound hole of the thing being amplified – rather than off to the side or hanging down at the waist.

    Handheld Transmitters are excellent for any application.  They are the easiest to use without feedback, and are very efficient in situations where the microphone will be shared by multiple users (passed around).

    The down side to Handheld Transmitters is that they are bulkier and are not easily concealed.  Also the benefit of the handheld mic can be negated if the person does not hold it in the correct position.,